Protein-packed, lactose-free – and sustainably packaged

Sustainability has become a ‘must-do’ in the food and beverage industry, and many companies are choosing to focus on packaging as the most impactful way to tell consumers about their sustainability commitment.

In an innovative move to curb its environmental impact, a major Brazilian dairy company is swapping plastic yoghurt cups for paper.

São Paulo-headquartered Vigor - a subsidiary of Mexico-based Grupo Lala - has launched a new yoghurt that comes in packaging made solely from paper, a material that is biodegradable and more recyclable than plastic. The Brazilian company estimates that the paper packaging will replace around 15 tonnes of plastic that would have been created in 2021.

Named Vigor Simples, this new line is made only from simple, natural ingredients such as milk, yoghurt bacteria, sugar and fruit jelly, and is free-from additives, preservatives, colouring or thickeners. Containing zero lactose, the yoghurt comes in 130g packs and in three varieties:

  • Traditional, with 16g of protein
  • Apricot, 14g of protein
  • Red fruits, 14g of protein

Vigor Simples is sold in the state of São Paulo at a suggested price of R$4,79 (€0.70/$0.84), which is similar to other protein-packed yoghurts on the market.

Flávia Drummond, marketing director at Vigor, said: "We are bringing to the category a yoghurt that is very healthy and natural, to meet the demand of consumers who care about the ingredients they are eating. These consumers, who are also thinking more and more about environmental impact, have inspired us to go further and develop a packaging that is unique in [Brazil].”

The launch is the latest in a series of steps that Vigor has taken to make its production more sustainable, including using PET packaging, which is more recyclable than other plastic materials, and supporting recycling in Brazil through commitments and partnerships.

 

Recent blogs
Protein-packed, lactose-free – and sustainably packaged Weight loss consumers seek keto Naturally functional plants beat meat-free alternatives Vegan, vegetarian, or just omnivore? Consumers are confused about “plant-based” Soylent taps into the nootropic niche market